Tag Archives: Nick Clark

Guest interview: Nick Clark

8 Apr

This week, Nick Clark, one of the UK Krampus Cracker authors, answers my questions about writing, his work in progress, and the books he’d choose if he could only keep three…

Find out more about Nick by following him on twitter @ngfclark

DSCN2149Nick at the Krampus Crackers launch event in December 2014.

  • If you had to describe yourself and your writing in fifty words or less, what would you say?

I’m a Leeds-based fiction author with a long-held interest in all that is speculative, sublime and surreal. I like to work with genre fusions and subversions of traditional tropes. My roots are in myth and folklore and worlds behind wardrobes. I plan sober, write drunk, and edit hungover.

  • What made you get involved with the Krampus crackers project and what inspired your story?

The Krampus name leapt out at me when I was skimming through potential story submission opportunities. I’d written an article on mythical Christmas beings the previous winter, so I was already clued up on Krampus and his ilk. The Tiny Owl project allowed me to explore the demon through a creative response, which I really enjoyed.

Flash fiction is entirely new to me. Most of my ‘short’ stories tend to hover around the 5,000 word mark – not really ideal when the typical competition out there caps a 3,000 word limit. Still, I was eager to give flash fiction a go, especially with a theme I was interested in.

I’m a big fan of the short stories of Kelly Link, and I knew I wanted to do something that placed a similar emphasis on stylisation and stark imagery. I wrote the story, edited it, and submitted it over five days. I didn’t have especially high hopes for it because of how little time I had, so I was overjoyed when I got the good news from Vicky. It also spurred me on to develop the setting into what might become a Yule-themed fantasy novel. I love it when the writing process starts linking things together like that!

  • What are you working on at the moment? Can you give us a sentence from your work in progress?

Helwick’s tower stood in the middle of a small island, and the sea encircled it – rising up for more than a hundred feet, so high that the sky above was framed by a ragged edge of restless ocean.

This is from my current project, a YA novel set in a post-apocalyptic flooded world. I know the whole ‘water planet’ concept has been done before, but I’ve always felt it was such a rich source of ideas that hasn’t been fully explored yet. This is my own take on it, which fuses the consequences of catastrophic climate change with epic fantasy, and aims to subvert some of the typical ‘high seas adventure’ tropes. It’s about a magician who wakes up after an enchanted sleep he cast on himself wears off. He’s suffering from amnesia, so we follow his exploration of the drowned world whilst he slowly uncovers his past – not all of it to his liking.

  • What’s your proudest writing achievement so far?

Aside from Krampus Crackers (of course), it would have to be my short story Rattenkönig, a ghost story that got published in Tethered By Letters’ quarterly journal. It was my first story to win a competition, my first to get illustrated, and my first paid gig as well. Needless to say it made me outrageously happy. TBL are really generous with their cash prizes and passionate about helping new authors. They’ve recently revamped their website so take a look.

  • Which novel do you wish you’d written, and why?

His Dark Materials by Philip Pullman. I was sixteen when I first read it, and it completely changed my view of what fiction could achieve and where it could go. I think it represented a direction I would have liked to take my own ideas of writing – if I’d been any good at that point – so of course I was immensely jealous of someone who could set out such accomplished and thought-out storytelling. Still am.

  • If you could only have three books to read for the rest of your life, what would they be?

OK, I’m going to give you a very practical answer for this:

    • Wonderbook by Jeff Vandermeer – Without books my writing would get very stale so a writer’s guide of some description would be essential. This one is beautifully illustrated and full of insightful detail.

    • Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism – It’s a book I’ve had since uni that contains absolutely tons of critical theory from throughout its history. Theory often requires repeated reading to get your head round it, so there’ll be plenty of time to do just that.

    • The last A Song of Ice and Fire book by George R R Martin – Obviously.

Thanks Nick!

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