Guest interview: June Taylor

16 May

Leeds-based writer June Taylor (flash fiction author and YA/New Adult novelist) discusses the frightening experience of writing about Krampus, tells us when she finally felt able to say ‘I am a writer!’ and insists that counting isn’t her strong point.

Follow June on Twitter @joonLT . June also tweets for Script Yorkshire @ScriptYorkshire

June 2

June reading ‘When Krampus Comes’ at the UK Krampus Crackers launch.

If you had to describe yourself and your writing in fifty words or less, what would you say?

I’m a writer from Leeds and very proud of my Yorkshire heritage. Like many writers, I need to write. Some days I wish I didn’t, but most days I’m glad that I can. I write mainly novels, but also plays and flash fiction. My novels are YA/New Adult crossovers. I’m interested in characters on the edge of themselves or on the edge of belonging. I’m particularly obsessed with mothers and daughters at the moment. I think you need a good plot but it’s the psychology between the characters that makes it interesting.

(That’s more than fifty words, sorry. I’m hopeless at counting.)

What made you get involved with the Krampus Crackers project and what inspired your story?

I love Tiny Owl Workshop and was involved in their Halloween flash fiction napkins a couple of years ago. They do some really innovative things. So when Vicky put the Krampus Cracker call out I couldn’t resist. And flash fiction is a great way of finding your way into bigger stories and characters. I often use it as a warm-up exercise. However, I have to confess that with my Victorian Krampus story I was totally led by Krampus himself. Really I was just his typist. It was a rather frightening experience. Then, when I was recruited as an elf to assemble the crackers I think I incurred the most paper cuts out of all the elves. It was horrific. You just don’t mess with Krampus.

What are you working on at the moment? Can you give us a sentence from your work in progress?

I’m working on my second book, ‘Two Summers’, a psychological page-turner told from a mother-daughter perspective. My agent is currently trying to sell it (see next question).

It is only in adventure that some people succeed in knowing themselves.” I didn’t write this sentence, André Gide did. But it sums it up pretty well and I was told to put a clever quote on the first page.

What’s your proudest writing achievement so far?

In 2011, I was runner-up in the Times/Chicken House Children’s Fiction Competition with my YA novel, ‘Lovely me Lovely You’. I got my picture in The Times newspaper and everything! It made me feel like a proper writer and able to say, finally, without shame or mumbling into my sleeve: “I AM A WRITER.” It also convinced family and friends that perhaps I’m not barking up the wrong tree after all – just a very tall one with some rather precarious branches. Anyway, I got a literary agent off the back of that success but – familiar story – although the book nearly found a major publisher, it didn’t in the end. I now have a new agent, the fabulous Shelley Instone, whose aim it is to champion Northern writers. I’m proud to be associated with Shelley. We’re a good team.

Which novel or poem etc. do you wish you’d written, and why?

Which poem …? Poetry generally doesn’t do it for me if I’m honest, unless it makes me feel something right away. If I have to search hard for its meaning then it loses its magic. I’d love to be able to write poetry/lyrics like Leonard Cohen. Music and poetry, that’s when it works best for me, I suppose. Or when it has some real relevance, like Simon Armitage’s ‘Black Roses: the killing of Sophie Lancaster’, which is an incredibly powerful use of poetry that conveys the tragic waste of a young life.

Which novel …? Perhaps a cliché in one sense, but I’d love to have written ‘Catcher in the Rye’, or ‘The Bell Jar’. I’d like to write a ‘best-friend’ book that connects with young people and stays with them through life.

Which screenplay …? ‘Thelma and Louise.’

Which radio drama …? ‘Under Milk Wood.’

Which stage play …? Anything by Shakespeare I suppose would make me look good.

If you could only have three books to read for the rest of your life, what would they be?

Well, at the risk of sounding pretentious I think Proust’s ‘A La Recherche du Temps Perdu’ because it would keep me going for life. I’ve only read one volume and there are seven to get through. (I’m assuming this counts as one choice though). Then also ‘Kes’, a book I never tire of reading. Third choice, maybe my book of fairytales I had as a child. I don’t have it any more but there were stories from all over the world in it, as well as the more well-known ones, and the illustrations were magical. It was massive. My chubby little fingers couldn’t turn the pages fast enough. But if that was never to be found again then maybe something else from my childhood, like ‘Wonderful Wizard of Oz’, ‘Alice in Wonderland’. Or ‘Daddy-Long-Legs’. Or ‘L-Shaped Room’… That’s actually more than three books, isn’t it? Told you I’m not very good at counting. Oh well, I’d try and smuggle the extra ones into my carrier bag.

Who said anything about a carrier bag? (I made that bit up actually. I’m good at that).

 Thanks June. I hope you got some enjoyment out of the Krampus Crackers experience. 🙂

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: